An early start leaving Cardiff at 0600, and after a long drive arriving at the Campsite situated at the bottom of Tryfan called Gwern Gof Isaf.

Gwern Gof Isaf Campsite in the distance
Gwern Gof Isaf Campsite in the distance

We were the only people there and we pitched our tents to give us the best views of Tryfan. We then set off to scramble up the North Ridge of one of the best mountain scrambles in the UK. We started our ascent heading for the small gully situated on the East side of Tryfan and from time to time were blessed with the sun coming through the clouds to show the great views that this scramble has to offer but these views were engulfed just as quick by the clouds leaving us with a gray sky and wondering thoughts of what the views from the top would be like.

Tryfan views from the North Ridge
Tryfan views from the North Ridge

 

We stopped to capture some of the great views from the North side of Tryfan when we had a cloud break, took on some water and continued to push to the top making our way through the maze of small gullies and climbing up and over the large boulders that obscured our path until we got to another flat section, where we then took a few minutes to enjoy more views while the sun broke through the clouds.

 

Tryfan views from the North Ridge
Tryfan views from the North Ridge

Tryfan is full of surprises, and can threaten you with any sudden change in the weather forecast. One minute you can be enjoying the views with clear skies and the next you can be surrounded by cloud and cold winds cutting into your hands and face obscuring your view with no more than just a few meters of viz of the way to the top or even the next pitch.

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Continuing in this cloud with periodic views of the surrounding landscape we finally reached the top of Trfyan with some of the best views of the Snowdonia National Park. The clouds were coming in and out during the short time we had on the top and at times it’s difficult to believe that we were at the top of a 918 meter high mountain and there was very little wind hitting us while we sat on the west facing side enjoying the views.

Looking over the Eastern side of Tryfan through the clouds gave us some great views looking down onto our start point and campsite for the night and in the distance  we could just see the world’s second largest wind-farm situated eight miles off the North Wales Coast. At full power, Gwynt y Môr’s 160 wind farm turbines can generate enough low carbon electricity to power more than 400,000 UK homes which is the same as powering a third of all the households in Wales.

Tryfan Summit
Tryfan Summit
Tryfan views from the Eastern side looking down the valley
Tryfan views from the Eastern side looking down the valley

 

Looking down at our descent with a glimpse of Heather Terrace and the footpath leading to the campsite just gives you a reminder as to how high we were.

 

View of Tryfan from the Campsite
View of Tryfan from the Campsite

 

Out of Your Comfort Zone
Out of Your Comfort Zone
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